Kilauea Farmers Market

At the local Farmers Markets you can find the most lucious locally grown fresh food. We visited the Farmers Markets both in Hanalei and Kilauea. Here we are, pulling into the Kilauea Farmers Market.

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At 9 am sharp. Right when it opens.

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Along with a throng of other eager shoppers.

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I’m suddenly starving for fresh organic vegetables

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and fresh tumeric, maybe…

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You stand there looking at it, vibing it, and just know intuitively, it’s an extremely healthy and therapeutic plant, er, root. A heavy-duty anti-carcinogenic, for sure. You should seriously buy a heap of it. Except, what do you do with it? Here, I googled it: “what to do with fresh tumeric’ Looks like you prepare and use it as a strong flavoring, much like you would fresh ginger. You might find the link helpful (or maybe Google it yourself) if you want to know more about how to use fresh tumeric root and especially if you think you’d like a recipe for Beef Rendang.

Ah, what have we here? ULU?

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Ditto healthwise on the ULU? So I Googled ULU too (say that five times really fast as a brain exercise – an added health bonus for reading my blog). ULU or ‘breadfruit’ is apparently grown in about 90 countries throughout South and Southeast Asia, the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean, Central America and Africa. It gets its name from the texture of the cooked fruit, which has a potato-like flavor, similar to freshly baked bread. It is a staple food in many tropical regions. ULU, like potatoes, are roasted, baked, fried or boiled. But, actually, since we hail from Idaho I think I’ll stick with potatoes. At least for now. I believe that’s the first time I’ve seen ULU’s in my entire life.

Eric is carrying our spoils

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What uncanny fashion sense he has. In this case, dressed as though he belongs in the basket.

Victor has home-cooked menus planned, lists made, before we hit the Farmers Market. Then he surprises us at mealtime. Like, with his won ton soup for lunch.

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Wontons stuffed with fresh pork and herbs, in a seasoned broth, garnished with fresh chinese bok choy, green onions and cilantro. (I think. I actually tried to make it myself after our last visit and it was a total disaster.)

But aren’t you getting healthier by the minute just reading this blog? The images alone should increase your vitamin, mineral and antitoxicant, I mean, antioxidant levels. And a brain exercise embedded in the blog to boot!

Yes, so we all need balance in our lives, so of course, we also eat lunch out – at the Kalypso in the center of Hanalei.

David's shadow entering Kalypso

David’s shadow entering Kalypso

The Kalypso is a great place for lunch, especially after dragging your body through a long strenous hike, and you need to shower before you can enter your own kitchen. The Kalypso offers a very special drink, you know, to quench your thirst after a long hike, or short hike, or walk on the beach, sunbathing on the beach, buying post cards, etc. It’s called an Inikki.(I may have spelled this wrong – it’s hard to recollect exactly.) Okay so I did spell it wrong – one of my dear readers sent me a FYI with this link as a hint as to how (and why) the drink is spelled: ‘Iniki’- as in ‘Hurricane Iniki’– a category 4 hurricane with 145 mph winds that hit Kauai September 5, 1992. Iniki was the most powerful hurricane to strike Hawaii in recorded history. Damage on Kauai was the greatest, where more than 1400 houses were destroyed, more than 5,000 damaged, and likely just as many chickens freed that still roam the island today. ‘Iniki’ – meaning, “strong and piercing wind.” We ordered four (plus an organic beer for Steph). Since the presentation was so beautiful I just had to take a picture:

Eric having an ecstacy experience

Eric having an ecstacy experience

Uh, news flash, Eric. Those drinks are for four people. Eric does appear to be deriving indescribable pleasure from his drink – I feel a tinge of guilt depriving him of mine. What? No way! Of course I’m drinking mine!

Usually at breakfast we devoured a fresh fruit plate (compliments of the Farmers Markets and Victor) – fresh pineapple, chinese grapefruit, papaya (picked from Steph and Vic’s tree), rambutan (those red spiny balls). Oh, here’s an example

Still-life of breakfast plates with the burned out LED sidewalk lamps Eric was supposed to fix

Still-life of breakfast plates with the burned out LED sidewalk lamps Eric was supposed to fix

We devour every last morsel.

'Victor depositing the last used napkin"

Victor depositing the last used napkin

We’ve got to beef ourselves up, you know, nourish and strengthen our bodies for the Jungle Hike ahead that Eric has planned for us. Does that sound like a potential death march to you?

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