Posts Tagged ‘Kentucky Fried Chicken in China’

Guilin! Li River Cruise

May 14, 2018

China Trip – Part 5

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 – We have checked out of our motel in Hangzhou, and are on our way to the airport to catch our flight to Guilin, a city about 800 miles south-southeast of Hangzhou. When you’re hanging out at West Lake in Hangzhou, it’s hard to imagine that you’re nestled in a city of 9.4 million people. I captured a couple of photos during our 45-minute drive to the airport, the first one of an older apartment building in the center of town

and the second photo of a typical newer high-rise apartment complex

But since you really can’t capture the layout of the dense urban sprawl in a photo – here – I took a video on our drive to the airport in Hangzhou –

New high-rise apartment complexes are springing up everywhere in China, however, property development in China is vastly out growing the number of people who can purchase them. According to this article, the Chinese government is launching building development across China to promote economic development. Property development has become big business! According to this article, “The 2011 estimates by property analysts state that there are some 89 million empty properties and apartments in China and that housing development in China is massively oversupplied and overvalued, and is a bubble waiting to burst with serious consequences in the future.” Well, that was a prediction in 2011. In 2018 the property development industry appears to be alive and booming as strong as ever. Still a bubble waiting to burst?

I wanted to mention this in my blog; it was amazing to see the huge new apartment complexes springing up around every large city we passed on the train.

We have arrived at the airport in Hangzhou. Wow! It, too, looks brand new.

Airport in Hangzhou

Oops! I’d better quit taking photos. I’m lagging behind David, Victor, Steph and Eric! (Well, not Eric – he’s taking photos too.)

A photo from the air now, as we approach Guilin:

By the way, Guilin is our third stop on our two-week (north to south) trip to China – the city furthest inland and our final destination on mainland China –

Destination cities – from Beijing in the north, traveling south to Hangzhou, Guilin, and Hong Kong

Guilin is situated in one of the world’s most beautiful landscapes, a region of limestone karst hills and mountains, rising almost vertically from the earth.

Karst Peaks near Guilin

These peaks were formed 200 million years ago when the area was under sea. Limestone was created from fossilized prehistoric sea-floor sediments. The sea bottom was pushed upward by geological forces and the sea receded. The exposed alkaline limestone was then eroded by the natural acidity of rain water collected in streams. Peaks developed from the land left after erosion by the streams. Cave systems have also developed in the limestone – a spelunker’s dream!

But we aren’t spelunkers. We are ordinary American tourists looking to book a relaxing cruise down the Li river right smack dab in the middle of these peaks. We check into the Shangri-La hotel in Guilin (having been thrilled with the Shangri-La in Hangzhou!). Victor immediately meets with the concierge ‘Ray’ who lines us up with a driver for the duration of our stay, ‘Terry.’ (This must be their given English names for when they serve English-speaking tourists?)

The concierge, Ray, and our driver, Terry.

We developed an affectionate bond with Ray and Terry, who treated us like we were the center of the Universe, responsive to our every need, during our stay at the Shangri-La Hotel in Guilin.

Ray and Terry

Somehow, too, our first evening there, Eric got snagged into participating in a dance in the lobby, much to our amusement. I caught the tail end of it in a video, with David, Victor and Steph watching in the background (the FAR background, I might add, so as to avoid Eric’s fate…)

These two hotties are the ones who snagged him.

(Okay, even Eric admits, it was totally worth it.)

So it’s Wednesday, April 18th, Ray has secured tickets for us to take the 4-hour Li-jiang River Cruise down the Li River along the Karst peaks. We meet Terry, our driver, at 8:15 am and he drives us 45 minutes to the Zhejiang Pier. Here – I took a photo of a picture in our brochure that shows you where the cruise originates on the Li River in the north to where it docks four hours later at the city of Yangshuo – a distance of about 80km or 50 miles:

Li-jiang River Cruise route

Okay, so Terry has dropped us off and we are in line (with hordes of people!) with our passports and tickets. Just move with the crush of the crowd. Our boat is number 12, which is, uh …

Which boat is ours?

Luckily Ray had also arranged a guide to help steer us along, a poised, well-dressed young lady who spoke excellent English, who greeted us in line and accompanied us onto our boat, which happens to be at the end of this dock.

It’s a tremendous relief to know we have found our boat, as, you can see, these boats are set at docks extending widely to the right

Boats to the right!


and to the left …

Boats to the left!

Ah… Relax now. We have a table to sit at inside our boat on the bottom level. With free hot tea service!

David, Jody, Victor, Steph

But the place to be is on the top deck…

Eric

There’s definitely a few other foreigners on this boat

Look at the boats behind us!

David and Eric

Vic and Steph

Jody and David

Several times during our trip a Chinese person would ask to pose for a photo or two with us, to which we happily concurred. This was one such lady, who wanted a photo with David and Eric.

Fun!

At some point our guide found us on the top deck – “Hey!” She informed us. “Did you know that we are passing the very spot that is pictured on the Chinese 20 Yuan bill? It’s coming right up!” Huh?

Here is a photo of the 20 Yuan bill:

And here is the photo I captured at the spot!

Scene on the Chinese
20 Yuan bill

And our photo memory of the moment:

David, Jody, Steph, Eric

(Don’t know where Victor was)

Pretty good, huh! I have at least 50 more photos … No? You don’t want to see them all? Okay, here’s just a couple more:

Up ahead is the famous rock face called the ‘Nine Horses Hill’

Nine Horses Hill

Left to the viewer to interpret how to find the nine horses in its face:

We are below again now – getting ready to dock, and totally entertained by this precocious little toddler sitting with his family across the isle from us. I’m trying to get his attention for a photo but he simply will not look at me!

His grandmother steps in to assist – just turn his head!

Oh well. That’s fine. A few minutes later he has settled down with his family. He’s so cute!

As I said, precocious. Definition: (of a child) “having developed certain abilities or proclivities at an earlier age than usual.” Is that a candy cigarette or a real cigarette? Hmmm. Hard to tell. I remember decades ago, when I was a kid, how much I loved candy cigarettes, posing with them, pretending to smoke, crunching them down slowly as I ‘smoked’ them. They have long since disappeared from store candy shelves. One interesting statistic we learned from one of our travel books is that 63% of Chinese men smoke cigarettes.

We have docked and are getting off the boat now in Yangshuo.

Docked!

We file through a huge market, but we just want to escape the crowds.

This woman in front of us reminds me never to buy a souvenir hat or T-shirt with Chinese characters on it.

Buy this t-shirt with English on the back!

Instructions to Victor from the driver are for us to walk to Kentucky Fried Chicken where he will meet us. Okay, that should be recognizable enough!

The city of Yangshuo has a population of about 300,000 people. Nestled amongst karst peaks!

Here is a video I took on our walk through a city shopping street:

Suddenly, across the street, an out-of-place Kentucky Fried Chicken sign comes into view – attached atop a building that doesn’t look even remotely similar to a Kentucky Fried Chicken! (Thank you, Victor, for orienting us here. I’ve no idea how we got here…)

Is it really a Kentucky Fried Chicken?

The next moment we walk right into our driver, Terry. I suspect maybe we stood out in the crowd more than he did.

Terry leads us along a main road to his vehicle. The traffic is crazy! A lane for cars and a lane for motorized scooters and rickshaws tearing along at the same speed and no one is wearing a helmet!

I took a couple of photos on the 50-mile drive back to Guilin.

Terry and Ray had arranged a tour for us on the way home – of an organic tea plantation. It was hot now in the late afternoon and we were glad they didn’t put us to work!

Hey, we’re just tourists!

As I said, it’s an organic tea farm. Workers suddenly appeared in the rows setting out sticky tar paper to catch insects!

Setting out sticky paper (yellow) to catch bugs

We learned the whole process of harvesting and preparing the tea leaves.

And enjoyed several different samples of hot fresh organic teas.

Whew! Exciting day, huh? Well, we have one more full day in Guilin before we head to Hong Kong. Are you ready? I have at least a hundred photos to prove it!